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  • Oral presentation
  • Open Access

Neutralizing anti-Tat antibodies prolonged HAART interruption in vaccines in a prospective structured interruption study

  • 1,
  • 1,
  • 2,
  • 2,
  • 3,
  • 2,
  • 4,
  • 4 and
  • 4
Retrovirology20063 (Suppl 1) :S15

https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-4690-3-S1-S15

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Placebo
  • Infectious Disease
  • Cancer Research
  • Cell Apoptosis
  • Epidemiological Data

Anti-Tat therapeutic vaccination has been clinically investigated by different groups [14], given that 1) extracellular Tat protein induces T cell apoptosis and cellular immune suppression, 2) epidemiological data showed that LTNP exhibit high level of serum anti-Tat Ab, negatively correlated with p24 antigenemia, 3) in Tat immunized macaques, viremia decreased following SHIV challenge. Anti-Tat therapeutic vaccination using Tat Toxoid adjuvanted either with Seppic [1, 2] or with alum or DcChol (Aventis Pasteur) proved to be safe. A prospective structured treatment interruption study (STI) monitored according to EU guidelines was conducted at Hospital St-Pierre, Brussels (Pr. N. Clumeck) on 31 vaccinees who received a DcChol adjuvanted Tat Toxoid (n = 12), a DcChol placebo (n = 8) or non adjuvanted Tat toxoid (n = 11). The 2 year study follow-up showed that vaccinees developing high titer of Abs neutralizing Tat bioactivity prolonged HAART-interruption.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Division of Infectious Diseases, CHU Saint-Pierre, Brussels, Belgium
(2)
Neovacs, S.A., 15, rue J-B. Berlier, 75013 Paris, France
(3)
Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Bordet Institute, 121 Blvd. de Waterloo, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
(4)
Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland Biotechnology Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

References

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