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  • Open Access

Primary HIV-1 Infection Sets the Stage for Important B Lymphocyte Dysfunctions

  • 1Email author,
  • 1,
  • 2,
  • 1,
  • 1,
  • 1,
  • 3,
  • 3,
  • 1,
  • 3 and
  • 1
Retrovirology20052(Suppl 1):P95

https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-4690-2-S1-P95

Published: 8 December 2005

Keywords

  • CD25 Expression
  • Healthy Donor
  • Primary Infection
  • Cell Compartment
  • Cell Dysfunction

Background

B lymphocytes of patients with chronic HIV-1 infection (CHI) show functional and phenotypic abnormalities. We investigated the effects of primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) on activation, differentiation and survival of B cells. The effects of antiretroviral therapies on B cell dysfunctions in PHI were also studied.

Design and Methods

B cells of 31 PHI patients (sampled at baseline, 1 month and 6 months post therapy), 26 CHI patients, and 12 healthy donors were studied for surface expression of Fas, LAIR-1, CD70, intracellular expression of Bcl-2, and spontaneous apoptosis. Four-colour FACS (IgD+IgM+CD19+CD27), and short-term PBMC cultures to analyse induction of CD25 on B cells were performed in 5 PHI patients.

Results

In PHI, naïve and memory B lymphocytes were highly activated, manifested by hypergammaglobulinemia, altered expression of Fas and LAIR-1, and increased spontaneous apoptosis. Antiretroviral treatment improved the activation/differentiation status of B cells, reduced apoptosis to levels comparable to healthy individuals and restored the ability of B cells to respond to T-cell dependent activation. B cells of PHI patients on HAART recovered better compared to patients on RTI only. Data obtained on 5 PHI patients at baseline showed decreased IgM+ memory B cells and lower induction of CD25 expression on B cells upon T cell activation. These parameters were normalized after 6 months of antiretroviral treatment.

Conclusion

B cell dysfunctions in HIV-1 infection appear during primary infection and initiation of antiretroviral therapy early during infection may help preserve the B cell compartment.

Notes

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Microbiology and Tumorbiology Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
(2)
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
(3)
Infectious Disease Clinic, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy

Copyright

© The Author(s) 2005

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