Volume 11 Supplement 1

16th Interntional Conference on Human Retroviruses: HTLV and Related Viruses

Open Access

Seroprevalence of Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 and -2 infections among first-time United States Blood Donors 2000-2009

  • Yun Brenda Chang1, 2,
  • Zhanna Kaidarova2,
  • Daniel Hindes2,
  • Marjorie Bravo3,
  • Nancy Kiely3,
  • Hany Kamel3,
  • Denise Dubay3,
  • Barbara Hoose3 and
  • Edward L Murphy4, 2
Retrovirology201411(Suppl 1):P61

https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-4690-11-S1-P61

Published: 7 January 2014

Background

Human T-lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and –2) are prevalent at low-level among United States blood donors, but recent data on their prevalence is lacking.

Methods

Data on all first-time blood donors in a large network of United States blood centers was examined during the period 2000-2009. Anti-HTLV-1 and -2 was measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) screening with type-specific confirmation by immunofluorescence or RIBA. Prevalence and odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations with demographic characteristics were assessed using multivariable logistic regression.

Results

Among 2,047,740 first-time donors, 104 donors were seropositive for HTLV-I (prevalence 5.1 (95% CI: 4.1 - 6.1) per 100,000) and 300 donors were seropositive for HTLV-2 infection (prevalence 14.7 (95% CI 13.0 - 16.3) per 100,000). Prevalence was lower than reported in the 1990’s but stable from 2000 to 2009. HTLV-1 seropositivity was associated with female sex (OR = 1.56, 95% CI 1.05-2.32); older age; and Black (IR = 25.29, 9% CI 13.14- 48.68) and Asian (OR = 21.43, 95% CI 10.31-44.53) race/ethnicity. HTLV-2 seropositivity was associated with female sex (OR = 2.13, 95% CI 1.67-2.73); older age; and non-white race/ethnicity; residence in the Western (OR=4.12, 95% CI 2.16-7.82) and Southwestern (OR=2.47, 95% CI 1.28-4.78; both vs. Northern) U.S.; and lower educational level.

Conclusions

HTLV-1 and -2 prevalences among U.S. blood donors declined since the early 1990’s but were stable since 2000. Higher prevalence of HTLV-2 in the West and Southwest may be attributed to endemic foci among Amerindians.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Biostatistics, Columbia University
(2)
Blood Systems Research Institute
(3)
Blood Systems, Inc.
(4)
Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco

Copyright

© Chang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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