Volume 11 Supplement 1

16th International Conference on Human Retroviruses: HTLV and Related Viruses

Open Access

Egg yolk antibodies (IgY) against Bovine Leukemia Virus

  • Cecilia Martínez1,
  • Gerónimo Gutiérrez1,
  • Irene Alvarez1,
  • Natalia Porta1,
  • Marina Lomónaco1,
  • Andrés Wigdorovitz1,
  • Pablo Chacana1Email author and
  • Karina Trono1
Retrovirology201411(Suppl 1):P46

https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-4690-11-S1-P46

Published: 7 January 2014

Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) is distributed worldwide and causes important economic losses on dairy farms. Currently, there are no effective vaccines or antivirals against BLV. Egg yolk antibodies (IgY) has many advantages over mammalian IgG. Despite the higher yields, they are non-invasively extracted from egg yolk, do not cross react against mammalian antigens or activate the mammalian complement system. In this work we evaluate the reactivity of Igy antibodies against Bovine Leukemia Virus p24 core protein and against the whole virus particle. Hens were immunized by intramuscular inoculation with purified p24 or the virus particle until the development of high antibody-titers. Total IgY was purified from egg yolks by ammonium sulfate precipitation. The purified egg yolk antibodies strongly reacted with BLV particles from a persistently infected cell line, with supernatants from ex vivo cultures of PBMCs from natural infected animals and also with purified p24 by both ELISA and Western blot. These data suggest that chicken IgY may be a suitable platform to produce large amounts of anti-BLV antibodies for diagnostic systems. Furthermore, the use of IgY for passive immunization against BLV infection should also be explored in order to develop new strategies to control the disease in cattle.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Instituto de Virologia, INTA

Copyright

© Martínez et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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