Skip to content

Advertisement

  • Poster presentation
  • Open Access

Early diagnosis of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (HAM/TSP) in HTLV-1 carrier clinic

  • 1,
  • 1,
  • 2 and
  • 1
Retrovirology201411 (Suppl 1) :P29

https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-4690-11-S1-P29

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Steroid
  • Family History
  • Blood Transfusion
  • Early Diagnosis
  • Lower Extremity

Early diagnosis and medical intervention are important for functional prognosis of HAM/TSP patients. In order to find out patients with early stage of HAM/TSP, we started HTLV-1 carrier clinic in the endemic area, Kagoshima, Japan, in 1999. Till the end of 2012, 407 persons have visited the clinic as first time-visitors of HTLV-1 carriers, and 6 cases were diagnosed as early stage of HAM/TSP. These 6 cases are 1 male and 5 females, 20-55 years old (mean=41.8) at the diagnosis, no history of blood transfusion, and 4 cases have family history of HAM/TSP. They could run and had no subjective symptoms on motor function, but all had subjective symptoms either dysesthesia/pain or urinary disturbances. Physical examination demonstrated hyper-reflexes of lower extremities with mild spasticity, positive Babinski signs, and decreased sweating of lower trunk and legs. Laboratory test showed positive anti-HTLV-1 antibodies in both sera and CSF, and proviral loads in the blood were high (386-2181 copies/104 PBMC) in all cases. Two cases were treated with steroids and their urinary disturbances were improved. After 2 years of follow up, their symptoms remained unchanged and decrease of proviral load was obtained in one case. These experiences in HTLV-1 carrier clinic indicate that early diagnosis of HAM/TSP is possible by careful medical checking of HTLV-1-positive individuals. Decrease of sweating in lower body, and hyper-reflexes of legs with typical Babinski sign are important signs for early diagnosis. Treatment intervention at early stage of the disease might improve functional prognosis of HAM/TSP patients.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Divisions of Molecular Pathology, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Kagoshima University, Japan
(2)
Department of Neurology and Geriatrics, Kagoshima University, Japan

Copyright

© Matsuzaki et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Advertisement