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  • Open Access

Investigation of the role of nuclear factors associated with double-stranded RNA protein members in the pathogenesis of HTLV-2

Retrovirology201411 (Suppl 1) :P113

https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-4690-11-S1-P113

  • Published:

Keywords

  • cDNA Library
  • Nuclear Factor
  • Viral Protein
  • Temporal Expression
  • Viral Transcription

It has recently been demonstrated that HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 utilise antisense transcription to express the viral proteins, HBZ and APH-2, respectively. Studies have shown that HBZ is a key player in the pathogenesis of HTLV-1 as its temporal expression appears to be critical for the development of ATL and HAM/TSP. To date very little is known about the role of APH-2 in HTLV-2 infection. Thus, to investigate its role in the pathogenesis of HTLV-2, we recently performed yeast two hybrid screens of several cDNA libraries using APH-2 as bait. We identified a member of the Nuclear Factors Associated with double-stranded RNA (NFAR) proteins as a potential interacting protein of APH-2. The NFARs have been shown to be involved in the regulation of gene expression and most notably; host anti-viral defence. Our research affords the opportunity to investigate the interaction of APH-2 and NFARs and determine how this interaction impacts on HTLV-2 lifecycle events. Our findings indicate that APH-2 and NFARs interact in vivo and in vitro. Immunofluorescence demonstrates that APH-2 and NFARs localise to the nucleus. We have also performed knockdown studies to determine the effect of NFAR proteins on HTLV-2 LTR promoter activity. Our results reveal that NFARs exert no effect on basal LTR activation, but inhibit Tax2B-mediated viral transcription. Additionally we report that in the presence of APH-2, NFARs enhance Tax2B-mediated LTR activation. Overall, this study will provide novel insights into the functional role of APH-2 and NFAR proteins in the pathogenesis of HTLV-2.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Centre for Research in Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Ireland

Copyright

© Murphy et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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