Volume 11 Supplement 1

16th Interntional Conference on Human Retroviruses: HTLV and Related Viruses

Open Access

An altered maturation and adhesion phenotype of dendritic cells in diseased individuals compared to asymptomatic carriers of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1

  • Sharrón L Manuel1,
  • Mohit Sehgal1,
  • Zafar K Khan1,
  • James J Goedert2,
  • Michael R Betts3 and
  • Pooja Jain1
Retrovirology201411(Suppl 1):O67

https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-4690-11-S1-O67

Published: 7 January 2014

As critical effectors of antiviral immune response, dendritic cells (DCs) are implicated to play an important role in determining the outcome of HTLV-1 infection. However, a complete understanding of their role in any disease pathogenesis requires extensive assessment of the phenotypic and functional state of DCs. To enable this, we developed a polychromatic antibody cocktail comprising key phenotypic and functional markers of DCs and applied it in a patient cohort from the HTLV-1 endemic region, Jamaica, consisted of seronegative controls, asymptomatic carriers (ACs), ATL, and HAM/TSP patients. This ex vivo analyses included two major subsets of blood DCs, myeloid and plasmacytoid (mDCs and pDCs, respectively). The comparative analyses of results demonstrated a decreased pDC frequency in both ATL and HAM/TSP patients as compared to ACs and seronegative controls. Similarly, CD86 expression on both mDCs and pDCs was significantly higher in HAM/TSP (but not ATL) patients compared to ACs. Interestingly, HLA-DR expression was significantly lower on pDCs of patients as compared to carriers, whereas for mDCs, only the HAM/TSP group had significantly lower expression of HLA-DR. Unlike HAM/TSP individuals, ATL individuals had significantly higher HLA-ABC expression on mDCs compared to ACs. Finally, both mDCs and pDCs of HAM/TSP patients had significantly higher PD-L1 expression compared to ACs. Overall, this study suggests that DCs are differentially regulated between patients (ATL and HAM/TSP) and carriers of HTLV-1 and could provide an important tool to understand HTLV-1 immunopathogenesis during infection and disease.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Drexel Institute for Biotechnology and Virology Research, and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Drexel University College of Medicine
(2)
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute
(3)
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Copyright

© Manuel et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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